Who’s fault is it if gradautes can’t spel?

EMPLOYERS BASH YOUNG JOBSEEKERS – BUT SURELY SCHOOLS ARE TO BLAME? 

The scrapping of GCSEs has re-ignited the debate about standards of literacy and numeracy among today’s young people entering the workforce.

But are the criticisms fair? And if standards in maths and English really have slipped, surely this is the fault of the education system, rather than a new, in-built flaw suddenly present in a whole generation?

Last month, the boss of a London PR company Emmett & Smith told Graduate Fog she regularly receives applications from graduates that are riddled with sloppy spelling, punctuation and typos.

And a recent survey found that 58% of business leaders complained that graduates lacked basic literacy and numeracy skills. Scott Payton, editor of londonlovesbusiness.com, which commissioned the research, declared:

“This is a damning indictment of higher education. We are talking about people who have spent three or four years at university who can’t add up or construct a sentence.”

What’s going on? Have standards really slipped – or do people just love to bash the young? As a word nerd, Graduate Fog is very strong on spelling and grammar – but our mental arithmetic and times tables are embarrassingly bad. If these are skills that employers look for, shouldn’t schools and universities be prioritising them?

 

*CAN YOU SPELL AND ADD UP?
Are you confident about your basic maths and English skills? Is it fair to blame graduates for their poor literacy and numeracy – or are schools to blame? Do you wish teachers had been tougher on your mistakes with adding up, grammar and apostrophes – or do you think these details shouldn’t matter to employers as long as you can do the job?

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